air rifles, antiques, bb guns, CaliAir, Carbines, Collector, Daisy, history, King, Lever Action, Model no 155, no.102, no.105B, Picking A Daisy, Picking A Daisy Show, Plinking, Rifles, Video, Vintage

Model 155 the Post War Daisy

World War II was over and Daisy had a few new tricks up their sleeve. With the interupted release of the Red Ryder in 1940 Daisy was ready to go back into production with several models. The 102, 105B, 111, and the “new” Model 155 1000 Shot all are very similar to one another in design. The main difference was shot capacity and barrel finish.
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The Model 155 intitialy came out of the gate in 1946 with an iron lever. In the video review there was question if the specimen we acquired had a cast iron lever. Test result are in. It’s not cast iron. The black paint is a dead give away that it was aluminum. A magnet confirmed all suspicions.
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The cast iron lever was only used in the 1946 run and replaced in 1947-1949 with the more common aluminum lever painted black (and typically worn off the lever).
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The Model 155 was reintroduced in 1952 and by 1953 came with the now standard painted barrel.
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For perspective consider this. The similar Model 102 first came out in 1933. It has a 500 shot capacity with a blued barrel and was produced until the no 102 Model 36 took its place in 1936 up until 1940. The War broke out and interrupted manufacturing of all BB guns including the Model 102. The Model 102 was officially out of production from 1947 to 1949. The Model 155 with its 1000 Shot capacity took its place on the shelves.
Of course this may have been in due part to the availability of the Markham King Number 55. The Number 55 Repeater 1000 Shot was first manufactured in 1923 til 1931. The King 55 was actually the last of the Daisy manufactured Kings which saw a few iterations (55-32, 55-33, 55-36) until all Kings were discontuntued in 1941.
This was not Daisy’s first 1000 Shot repeater. There was the Bennet from 1903 and the Model 3 in 1904 and the Model B from 1910. Since Daisy “acquired” many of the early BB gun manufacturers it makes a fascinating study discerning what design truly belong to whom.
22-33, air rifles, antiques, bb guns, Carbines, Collector, King, Lever Action, Rifles, Vintage

King Model 22-33 Repeater

William F. Markham is arguably considered the maker of the modern bb gun. Daisy commissioned and then quickly bought out Markham in 1916. By 1928 they renamed the Markham Air Rifle Company to “King”.

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Daisy continued producing their King models til 1935 and ceased production entirely by 1940. You can see how the Daisy and King guns were so alike. I’ve not been able to tell any difference in quality or craftsmanship.

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The Kings were known as the “B Grade” to the Daisy brand but this may have been more hype than reality. It also helped Daisy leverage deals with major outlets such as Sears, Roebuck and Co..

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Obviously the nuts on this 22-33 are replacements – but they are old square replacements. I will try to find appropriate replacement nuts for this rifle. Finding pictures of the gun in the original shape helps me alot in restoring these amazing relics.

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This acquisition is from 1933 to 1935. It was replaced by the “Daisy influenced” 22-36. I don’t know how many of these were produced but we do know that they were only produced for 3 years. This may have an effect on it’s collectability and rarity.

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I will be doing a video of this King 22-33 as soon as it is received. There may be issues with the ammo since pre 1934 guns used slightly different diameter bb’s to the now standard .177 diameter.

This King just sort of came up and I had to jump on it even though I’m swearing off of buying any more until I can trade off some of my duplicates. That and maybe sell some cool stickers which are coming real soon. The King of Air Rifles!

See the entire list of Lever Action Carbines.

air rifles, antiques, bb guns, Carbines, Collector, Daisy, history, Lever Action, model 40, no.111, Red Ryder, Rifles, Vintage

No. 111 Model 40 Variant 5

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This was my first vintage Red Ryder. It’s from 1947 and I was immediately impressed with how it shot and felt in the hands. I started out collecting no.25’s and even tried to stay away from the Red Ryder knowing the rabbit hole that would ensue.

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Curiosity and a good deal got the best of me and I acquired this treasure. This was the Red Ryder that was produced after WWII now using the aluminum lever in place of the war depleted cast iron.

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This Model 40 arrived with a missing barrel band. Luckily I was able to find an aftermarket band that works just fine. Ideally I’d like to find a period appropriate band to replace it but this will do for now. I oiled up the wood on this gun because it was very dry.

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The front sight was bent a little to the left. I was going to bend it back and found that the bend actually compensated for the slight drift. My guess is it was bent on purpose so I left it alone.

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I’ve talked about how the older Red Ryder’s are loud and this one is no exception. It’s still backyard friendly but it is especially loud if it’s shot without a bb in the chamber. This could easily be considered the most common of the wood stock and forearm vintage No.111’s. After this variant they started using plastics at first in the forearm and then the stock.

Check out all the Lever Action Carbines here.

air rifles, antiques, bb guns, Carbines, Daisy, Lever Action, model 40, no.111, Red Ryder, Rifles, Vintage

1950’s Iconic Red Ryder no.111

There is something appealing about the 1950’s Red Ryder. In 1952 they began to replace the wood front stock with a “fancy” plastic design. The early plastics had a tendency to warp from the heat of the sun and few models escaped this anomaly.

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I was excited to get another one of these in the collection. They still have the wood rear stock with the Fred Harman Red Ryder engraving and the saddle ring. The models from the 50’s tend to hit pretty hard. This seems to be the consensus from fellow owners.

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These guns were made in the Plymouth Michigan factory where all Daisy’s were made up until 1958. Before the Rogers Arkansas factory took over production the Plymouth factory was putting out rifles with both plastic stocks and forearms.

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The 1952 Red Ryder would be the last to see a wood stock until the reissues came out in the 70’s with the Model 1938 Red Ryder. The no.111 Model 40 has come full circle from 1940 all wood, to 1950’s partial wood, to late 50’s/60’s all plastic and back now to all wood.

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This particular rifle has some replacement nuts but is otherwise original and complete.

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The classic tiny ding on the side of the barrel. It makes you wonder how many kids shot their own bb gun and why? The barrels are still “blued” and the brownish patina is testament to this. The painted barrels had the advantage of not rusting as easily and eventually all Red Ryder’s and most Daisy’s will be painted.

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Definitely not the original nuts. I don’t mind the brass one but I’ll look for proper replacements for them. By 1947 the cast iron lever was forever replaced by a cast aluminum lever that was painted black. The paint easily came off and that issue would be solved in the 80’s with a special plastic lever.

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As with many vintage models this one is a little on the loud side. Still tenable for backyard plinking but not the quietest plinker. It’s possible a synthetic seals would make it more quiet. My 102 Cub from 1960’s is super quiet – but I’m not sure if the gun was worked on or functioned that way out of the box. I’m assuming it has synthetic seals none the less. And I will further assume the 1952 model shown here has leather seals and contributes to it’s loud report.

The Red Ryder is the greatest selling bb gun of all time. The bulk of them would have been the plastic stock models. Although production began in 1940 it was halted due to WWII. Regular production didn’t resume until 1946 and by 1952 the plastic made it’s entry into the design. The plastic stock and forearm Red Ryder’s would have a good 20+ year production run before the return of the wood reintroduced on the Model 1938 Red Ryder in 1977.

It’s hard not to pick up more Red Ryder’s. They are great guns and like this 1952 Red Ryder are loads of fun to shoot.

Check out all of the Lever Action Carbines here.

air rifles, antiques, bb guns, Buck, CaliAir, Carbines, Cleaning Kit, Collector, Daisy, Lever Action, No. 10, no.105B, Picking A Daisy Show, Plinking, Rifles, Video, Vintage

Picking A Daisy Show

In today’s vlog episode of “Picking A Daisy Show” your host CaliAir shares the latest Daisy finds. A very cool and good condition Daisy Gun Cleaning Kit from the 1950’s, shooting the new Model 10 and Buck… again.

Come join me on the next Live Broadcast of the “Picking A Daisy Show”. Subscribe and turn on notifications to be alerted of the next upcoming episode on YouTube.

I just started an Instagram account for Picking A Daisy! Go follow the channel and I’ll be sure to follow you back! www.instagram.com/pickingadaisy

View the Daisy Gun Cleaning Kit here.

Check out the entire CaliAir Collection here.

air rifles, antiques, bb guns, Carbines, Daisy, history, Lever Action, Lightning Loader, Model 39, No. 108, Red Ryder, Rifles, Vintage

Lightning Loader No.108 model 39

IMG_0609The No.108 has a special place in my world of collecting Daisy’s. The Lighting Loader from 1939 is very interesting. It sort of came before the wildly  famous Model 40 also known as the No.111 Red Ryder. Except the story is the Red Ryder was actually developed in 1938 and not released until 1940. The 1972 Red Ryder was renamed the Model 1938 in recognition of this. Personally I think the Model 39 Lightning Loader has a great feel to it. It doesn’t have the saddle ring or the etching on the stock and the foregrip is smaller than that of the Red Ryder. But this is what I actually like about the Model 39.IMG_4432

Without the frills and sporting the pre war cast iron lever gives this carbine a serious look. The barrel is considerably shorter than the Red Ryder making this an SBR… just kidding.

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From what I gather they must have sold this model as they were getting ready to license and market the Red Ryder. The No. 108 is getting more difficult to find in good condition. A lot was going on in the world when the Lightning Loader came out in 1939. By 1942 all production was halted until 1945 after WWII. The Model 39 and the Model 40 variants 1 to 4 are the last guns to get the cast iron levers. The post war iron shortage caused the company to go with cast aluminum from 1947 onwards.

Check out all the lever action carbines here.

antiques, bb guns, Carbines, Collector, Daisy, JC Higgins, King, Lever Action, Rifles, Vintage, Westerner, Youth Guns

JC Higgins Westerner

Sears, Roebuck and Co. stocked Daisy bb guns and rebranded them. These guns were often King rifles with a new name and model. For a long time they were not as valuable as the actual Daisy guns. Recently I’ve seen the Sears, Roebuck and Co guns raise in value and vintage collectability.

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I have to say this little youth sized carbine is one of my favorites. It’s an all black, molded plastic stock and foregrip. The lever is painted black aluminum. The stock is engraved and has diamond stippling as does the foregrip.

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The flip sights may clue us into the exact date of this carbine. The nuts have been replaced on this otherwise complete gun.

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Officially this is called the JC Higgins Westerner Model 799-2990. Dating this is tricky. The receiver has Plymouth stamped upon it. This makes it a pre 1958… but the model # sequence is similar to the 1969-73 productions. We do know that Daisy was no longer selling through Sears, Roebucks and Co when they changed their name to Sears.

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