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The Red Ryder 1938B Model

CaliAir talks about the peculiarly named “1938” Red Ryder and compares it to the Model 40’s that preceded it. Daisy perhaps by way of space time travel reissued the non existent 1938 Model in 1972 and then again in the 80’s. The original “1938 Model” from 1972 was almost identical to the 1952 Model 40 no.111.

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Today’s featured gun is the 1988 50th Anniversary Commemorative 1938B. It seems the letter “B” is used to nomenclate a reissue. The current Buck no.105B lever action youth gun uses this identification as well. This leaves us with a slight perplexity. The original No.105 Junior Buck from 1933 was a pump action not a lever action gun. In fact the 1933 No.105 was really just the Markham designed No.5 pump gun rebranded.

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Perhaps someone over at Daisy can enlighten us on the peculiar model naming conventions that were used.

This particular carbine is a good shooter. It’s quiet and still hits hard. It has moderate wear and hasn’t seen much abuse. It survived the 80’s better than a lot of folks I know.

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I have Daisy guns from the 1940’s that have painted barrels. By the 1950’s/60’s Daisy started painting most of their barrels. The blueing, nickel and chrome plated guns have their charm but few have escaped the ravages of rust. The painted guns do have the unique advantage of resisting rust.

My best guess thus far is the”1938B” date is significant because it was the date when the Red Ryder started being designed. Licensing was acquired 1939 and sales and marketing began in 1940. That is – sold until 1942 as WWII progressed. The cast iron lever 1st variant Model 40 is easy to spot with it’s cooper sight and barrel bands. These features were gone when production resumed in 1946.

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